SCAM alerts and information

6 posts

Take Five To Stop Fraud

These days, criminals are experts at impersonating people, organisations and the police, so it can be difficult to spot scam texts, emails and phone calls. However, there are things we can all do to protect ourselves.

As Brits we aren’t renowned for being direct. Research reveals 92% of Brits have said ‘yes’ to a scam because they don’t want to appear rude saying ‘no’. When it comes to fraudsters, being indirect could have serious financial and emotional consequences.

If someone contacts you asking for your personal or financial information it’s important to say ‘no’. It’s ok to reject, refuse or ignore any requests. Only criminals will try to rush or panic you.

REPORTING FRAUD AND SCAMS

If you receive a scam email, you can forward it to report@phishing.gov.uk

If you receive a scam text, forward it to 7726 (which spells ‘SPAM’ on your telephone keypad)

If you have made a payment in response to a scam, contact your bank as soon as possible as they may be able to recover some of your money and will refund you in certain circumstances.

If you believe you have been the victim of fraud, you can call Lincolnshire/Leicestershire Police on 101. If you or someone else is in immediate danger because of a scam (for example, being threatened by an aggressive doorstep caller), call the Police on 999.

You can also report fraud to Action Fraud either by phone or online:
0300 20123 202040
http://actionfraud.police.uk

FURTHER ADVICE AND INFORMATION

Take Five is a national campaign that offers straight-forward and impartial advice to help everyone protect themselves from preventable financial fraud. This includes email deception and phone-based scams as well as online fraud – particularly where criminals impersonate trusted organisations.

Read more on their website:
https://takefive-stopfraud.org.uk

Ghost Broker Alert

http://primoartdiscoverytours.co.uk/event/joseph-wright-of-derby-and-the-men-and-art-of-the-lunar-society-at-gainsborough-dfas/ Do You Know What A Ghost Broker is?

Just 15% of people have heard of a ‘ghost broker’.*

Do you know what one is? Have you ever heard of a ‘ghost broker’?

No, we are not talking about things that go bump in the night – this is a lot scarier. ‘Ghost brokers’ are fraudsters who sell fake or invalid car insurance policies. Victims are sold fake insurance documents for a policy that does not exist, or for a genuine policy that has been set up using false details to lower the price of the premium.

How do ‘ghost brokers’ operate?

Fraudsters lure victims in with the offer of cheaper insurance premiums, usually via social media or by word-of-mouth. These individuals or groups pose as middlemen for well-known insurance companies, claiming they can offer you legitimate car insurance at a significantly cheaper price. This type of fraud is typically carried out either by forging insurance documents, falsifying your details to bring the price down, or by taking out a genuine policy for you but cancelling it soon after.

Often, the victim is not aware that they have been scammed until they are involved in an accident and try to claim on the policy. Who do ‘ghost brokers’ target? ‘Ghost brokers’ tend to target vulnerable communities, including members of non-English speaking communities who may not have full knowledge of UK insurance and laws, as well as young people looking for cheaper insurance deals.

Last year, Action Fraud received 694 reports of ‘ghost broking’, with almost a third (29%) coming from victims aged 17-29. The reported losses for these victims alone totalled £113,500, with each individual losing an average of £559. Figures also indicate that over half (58%) of all reports in 2020 were submitted by men.

What could happen if I drive without valid insurance? As policies sold by ‘ghost brokers’ are either invalid, non-existent or fraudulent, this means that the driver is technically uninsured, meaning that you could face:

* £300 fixed penalty notice

* Six points on driving licence

* Vehicle being seized and crushed

How can I protect myself from ‘ghost brokers’? There are simple steps that you can take to spot the signs of these scams and avoid being taking for a ride by ‘ghost brokers’: * ‘Ghost brokers’ often advertise and communicate via social media, online forums and messaging apps. If a broker is only using a mobile phone or email as a way of contact, this can be a sign of this type of crime. Fraudsters do not want to be traced after they have taken money from their victims. * They may also try to sell insurance policies through print adverts in pubs, clubs or bars, newsagents *

If a deal seems too good to be true, then it probably is. If you are not sure about the broker, check on the Financial Conduct Authority web page or other insurance bodies shown below.

Financial Conduct Authority  – FCA web Page

British Insurance Brokers Association BIBA web page

Motor Insurance Database.MID

If you think that you have been a victim of a ghost broker, you can report your concerns to Action Fraud at actionfraud.police.uk
Actionfraud.police.uk

You can also contact the Insurance Fraud Bureau via its confidential Cheatline on 0800 422 0421 or on the IFB website

Insurancefraudbureau

Message Sent By
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Free Webinars About Scams In July

Following on from our Alert last week relating to yet another online scam to look out for, I am delighted to be writing to you to invite you to join us in July for a month of weekly online webinars to expose the truths behind scams.
The webinars are Temuco FREE to attend and are open to anyone who would like to know more about scams, the Gwaram psychology behind scams, Pottstown prevention and how a fraud case is investigated.

The webinars bring together experts in their field relating to online fraud, a topic which we are all too familiar with and can affect anyone and everyone, as our lives are played out more digitally.

The dates of the webinars and their topics are as follows:

6th July, 5pm
Exploring the psychology behind scams and how scammers are so effective at their crimes
Paul Maskell, Fraud & Cyber Crime Prevention Manager, Dedicated Card and Payment Crime Unit (DCPCU)

14th July, 5pm
Insights into how a fraud case is investigated and how not to be the next victim 

Ben Hobbs, Detective Sergeant; and Catriona Still, Head of Fraud Prevention & Training, Dedicated Card and Payment Crime Unit (DCPCU)

23rd July 5pm
Scams awareness training from the Friends Against Scams initiative
The National Trading Standards Scams Team (NTSST)

30th July, 5pm
Don’t get hooked by scammers! What you need to know about flubot and phishing scams
Christopher Budd, Senior Global Threat Communications Manager, Avast

How to book your place
You can click on the links within this message on each of the webinars topics to register your place or you can go to www.ourwatch.org.uk/webinars and click on the webinar that you wish to attend, you can attend all of them if you wish and so make sure that you complete the registration page for each of them.

We look forward to seeing you all there.

Best wishes

Cheryl

Cheryl Spruce | Head of Membership and Community Engagement
NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH NETWORK, Central Support Team